SESAME, Hurtle & NetFloc

Recently, at EUCNC’16, the ZHAW SESAME team demonstrated the work of combining SESAME concepts through the use of Hurtle, our orchestration framework, and Netfloc, our SDK for datacenter network programming. The demonstration was also a joint demonstration between SESAME and the 5GPPP COHERENT project.

It was a demonstration that bridges the gap between the telco and cloud world by creating a network service based on the services and technologies coming from both projects.

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Observations from 11th NGSDP Experts Talk

On 22nd April 2016 the 11th Experts Talk on Next Generation Service Delivery Platforms (NGSDP) was held at the Telekom Innovation Laboratories in Berlin. The purpose of the event is to bring together thought-leaders in the area of Next Generation Services to discuss the state of the art in the field. Continue reading

Orchestrating IMS – Project Clearwater on CloudStack using Heat and Hurtle

Project Clearwater is an open source implementation of IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS) developed for scalable deployment in the cloud to provide voice, video and messaging services. There has been  work done before on orchestrating Clearwater in OpenStack using Cloudify. We, in cooperation with our partner – Citrix, present orchestration of this system in Apache CloudStack using OpenStack Heat with our recent plugin. Continue reading

OpenStack Heat plugin for Apache CloudStack

This blog post presents a plugin for OpenStack Heat which adds support for Apache CloudStack resources and thus enables a template-based orchestration on CloudStack using Heat. As this plugin extends the standard Heat’s resource type list it can also be used within our Hurtle orchestrator for providing your application as a service or any other application underlying on Heat. This work follows from our earlier work in which we developed a Heat plugin for SDC. Continue reading

MCN and ICCLab Demo at EUCNC

As part of our on-going work in MobileCloud Networking the project demonstrated at this year’s EUCNC, held in a very warm (> 35*C !!!) Paris, France.

The MCN demonstration was built on top of a standard cloud infrastructure, leveraging key technologies of OpenStack and OpenShift and used (open source outputs of MCN, namely hurtle – the cloud orchestration framework of the ICCLab which is used throughout MCN to enable service delivery. Also demonstrated was the use of the ICCLab’s billing solution, Cyclops that is orchestrated using Hurtle. All of this delivers a NFV-compatible, on-demand, composed service instance.

The MobileCloud Networking (MCN) approach and architecture was demonstrated aiming to show new innovative revenue streams based on new service offerings and the optimisation of CAPEX/OPEX. Of particular note and focus, the work highlighted results of cloudifying the Radio Access Network (RAN) and delivering this capability as an on-demand service.

Supporting this focus was the composition of an end-to-end service (RAN, EPC, IMS, DNS, Monitoring & Billing) instance via the MCN dashboard. This demo service is standards compliant and features interoperable implementations of ETSI NFV, OCCI and 3GPP software.

 

Cloud Orchestration: Hurtle Released

We are proud to announce that the ICCLab has released Hurtle!

Hurtle logo Hurtle

 

Hurtle is a result of the ICCLab’s Cloud Orchestration Initiative.

What is hurtle?

With Hurtle, you automate the life-cycle management of any number of service instances in the cloud, from deployment of resources all the way to configuration and runtime management (e.g., scaling) of each instance. Our motivation is that software vendors often face questions such as “How can I easily provision and manage new instances of the service I offer for each new customer?”, this is what Hurtle aims to solve.

In short, Hurtle lets you:

offer your software as a service i.e. “hurtle it!”

In Hurtle terms, a service represents an abstract functionality that, in order to be performed, requires a set of resources, such as virtual machines or storage volumes, and an orchestrator which describes what has to be done at each step of a service lifecycle.
A “service instance” is the concrete instantiation of a service functionality with its associated set of concrete resources and service endpoints.

On top of this, Hurtle has been designed since its inception to support service composition, so that you can design complex services by (recursively!) composing simple ones.

Hurtle’s functionality revolves around the idea of services as distributed systems composed of multiple sub-applications, so the services offered are also ones that can be designed with the cloud in mind, based on the cloud-native application research of the ICCLab.

What does it mean to offer software as a service?

A bit of history first. Traditionally software has been ran locally, then was centralised and shared through intra-nets. All of this was still on company-specific infrastructure. This made hosting, provisioning and managing such software difficult and the full time job of many IT engineers and system administrators.

This quickly brought about the argument that IT in a SME or an enterprise was a cost centre that should be minimised and lead to outsourcing of such tasks to 3rd parties.

Now today with the ever growing acceptance and use of cloud computing the cost equation is again further reduced, but more interestingly, cloud computing reverses the trend of outsourcing operations to third parties if you consider the movement of devops.

In this new world organisations that create software don’t want nor need third parties to manage their software deployments. They have much of the tooling needed, developed in-house. If they don’t, yet still want to follow a devops approach they’ve quite an amount of work ahead of them.

It is in this scenario where hurtle can help!

What can hurtle do?

What will hurtle do?

  • More examples including the cloud native Zurmo implementation from ICCLab
  • Enhanced workload placement, dynamic policy-based
  • Support for docker-registry deployed containers
  • Runtime updates to service and resource topologies
  • CI and CD support
    • safe monitored dynamic service updates
  • TOSCA support
  • Support for VMware and CloudStack
  • User interface to visualise resource and services relationships
  • Additional external service endpoint protocol support

Want to know more?

Checkout: hurtle.it

MobileCloud Networking Live @ Globecomm

As part of the on-going work in MobileCloud Networking the project will demonstrate outputs of the project at this year’s Globecomm industry-track demonstrations. Globecomm is being held this year in Austin, Texas.

MobileCloud Networking (MCN) approach and architecture will be demonstrated aiming to show new innovative revenue streams based on new service offerings and the optimisation of CAPEX/OPEX. MCN is based on a service-oriented architecture that delivering end-to-end, composed services using cloud computing and SDN technologies. This architecture is NFV compatible but goes beyond NFV to bring new improvements. The demonstration includes real implementations of telco equipment as software and cloud infrastructure, providing a relevant view on how the new virtualised environment will be implemented.

For taking the advantage of the technologies offered by cloud computing today’s communication networks has to be re-designed and adapted to the new paradigm both as developing a comprehensive service enablement platform as well as through the appropriate softwarization of network components. Within the Mobile Cloud Networking project this new paradigm has been developed, and early results are already available to be exploited to the community. In particular this demonstration aims at deploying a Mobile Core Network on a cloud infrastructure and show the automated, elastic and flexible mechanism that are offered by such technologies for typical networking services. This demonstration aims at showing how a mobile core network can be instantiated on demand on top of a standard cloud infrastructure, leveraging key technologies of OpenStack and OpenShift.

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The scenario will be as following:

  1. A tenant (Enterprise End User (EEU), in MCN terminology) – may be an MVNO or an enterprise network – requests the instantiation of a mobile core network service instance via the dashboard of the MCN Service Manager – the the service front-end where tenants can come and request the automated creation of a service instance via API or user interface. In particular the deployment of such core network will be on top of a cloud hosted in Europe. At the end of the provisioning procedures, the mobile core network endpoints will be communicated to the EEU.
  2. The EEU will have the possibility to access the Web frontend of the Home Subscriber Server (HSS) and provision new subscribers. Those subscribers information will be used also for configuring the client device (in our case a laptop).
  3. The client device will send the attachment requests to the mobile core network and establish a connectivity service. Since at the moment of the demonstration the clients will be located in the USA, there will be a VPN connection to the eNodeB emulator through which the attachment request will be sent. At the end of the attachment procedure all the data traffic will be redirected to Europe. It will be possible to show that the public IPs assigned to the subscriber are part of the IP range of the European cloud testbed.
  4. The clients attached to the network will establish a call making use of the IP Multimedia Subsystem provided by the MVNO. During the call the MVNO administrator can open the Monitoring as a Service tool provided by the MCN platform and check the current situation of the services. For this two IMS clients will be installed on the demonstration device.
  5. At the end of the demonstration it will be possible to show that the MVNO can dispose the instantiated core network and release the resources which are not anymore necessary. After this operation the MVNO will receive a bill indicating the costs for running such virtualized core network.

It specifically includes:

  • An end-to-end Service Orchestrator, managing dynamically the deployment of a set of virtual networks and of a virtual telecom platform. The service is delivered from the radiohead all the way through the core network to service delivery of IMS services. The orchestration framework is developed on an open source framework available under the Apache 2.0 license and is where the ICCLab actively develops and contributes.
  • Interoperability is guaranteed throughout the stack through the adoption of telecommunication standards (3GPPP, TMForum) and cloud computing standards (OCCI).
  • A basic monitoring system for providing momentary capacity and triggers for virtual network infrastructure adaptations. This will be part of the orchestrated composition.
  • An accounting-billing system for providing cost and billing functions back to the tenant or the provisioned service instance. This will be part of the orchestrated composition.
  • A set of virtualised network functions:
  • A realistic implementation of a 3GPP IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS) based on the open source OpenIMSCore
  • A realistic implementation of a virtual 3GPP EPC based on the Fraunhofer FOKUS OpenEPC toolkit,
  • An LTE emulation bases on the Fraunhofer FOKUS OpenEPC eNB implementation
  • Demonstration of IMS call establishment across the provisioned on-demand virtualised network functions.