SmartDataCenter APIs – turning up the Heat

As mentioned in the first post about SmartDataCenter, it features various APIs. In this post we will have a look at them. Further I would like to present sdcadmin & sdc-heat, two small Python projects I have been working on. The former is a Python client library for SDCs admin APIs. The latter is an OpenStack Heat plugin that allows provisioning of SmartMachines and KVM VMs on SDC.

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Introduction to SmartDataCenter

Joyent recently open sourced the IaaS Platform SmartDataCenter and the Object Storage Manta, the software they use for their own service offerings. So, what’s all the buzz about? Why should you be excited? Why is it even worth talking (or in this case, writing) about SDC when we have OpenStack? In this blog post I will cover some of the fundamentals of SDC and why it’s worth a second look.

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SmartOS Series: Storage

In the third part of the SmartOS Series (check the first two parts: Intro and Virtualisation) we are going to deep dive into the SmartOS Storage: ZFS.

ZFS is a combination of file system and logical volume manager originally introduced in Solaris 10. ZFS includes many features that are key for a Cloud OS such as SmartOS:

  • Data integrity. ZFS is designed with a focus on data integrity, with particular emphasis on preventing silent data corruption. Data integrity in ZFS is achieved using a checksum or a hash throughout the whole file system tree. Checksums are stored in the  pointer to the block rather than in the block itself. The checksum of the block pointer is stored in its pointer, and so on all the way up to the root node. When a block is accessed, its checksum is calculated and compared to the one stored in the pointer to the block. If the checksums match, the data is passed to the process requesting it; if the checksums do not match, ZFS will retrieve one of the redundant copy and try to heal the damaged block.
  • Snapshots. ZFS uses a copy-on-write transactional model that, when new data is written, the block containing the old data is retained, making it possible to create a snapshot of a file system. Snapshots are both quick to create and space efficient, since data is already stored and unmodified blocks are shared with the file system. ZFS allows for snapshots to be moved between pools, either on the same host or on a remote host. The ZFS send command creates a stream representation either of the entire snapshot or just of the blocks that have been modified, providing an efficient and fast way to backup snapshots.
  • Clones. Snapshots can be cloned, creating an identical writable copy. Clones share blocks and, as changes are made to any of the clones, new data block are created following the copy-on-write principles. Given that initially clones share all the blocks, cloning can be instantaneous doesn’t consume additional disk space. This means that SmartOS is able to quickly create new almost identical virtual machines.
  • Adaptive Replacement Cache (ARC). ZFS makes use of different levels of disk caches to improve file system and disk performance and to reduce latency. Data is then cached in a hierarchical manner: RAM for frequently accessed data, SSD disks for less frequently accessed data. The first level of disk cache (RAM) is always used for caching and uses a variant of the ARC algorithm similar to level 1 CPU cache. The second level (SSD disks) is optional and is split into two different caches, one for reads and one for writes. Populating the read cache, called L2ARC, can take some hours and, in case the L2ARC SSD disk is lost, data will be safely written to disk, i.e. no data will be lost. The write cache, called Log device, stores small synchronous writes and flushes them to disk periodically.
  • Fast file system creation. In ZFS, creating or modifying a filesystem within a storage pool is much easier than creating or modifying a volume in a traditional filesystem. This also means that creating a new virtual machine in SmartOS, i.e. adding a new customer for a cloud provider, is extremely fast.

Another very interesting feature added by Joyent in SmartOS with regards to storage is disk I/O throttling. In Solaris, a zone or an application could potentially monopolize access to the local storage, almost blocking other zones and applications to access it and causing performance degradation. With disk I/O throttling in place all zones are guaranteed a fair amount of access to disk. If a zone is requesting access to disk over its limits, each I/O call will get delayed by up to 100 microseconds, leaving enough time for the system to press I/O requests from other zones. Disk I/O throttling only comes into effect when the system is under heavy load from multiple tenants; during quiet times tenants are able to enjoy faster I/O.

The main ZFS components in SmartOS are pools and datasets:

  • Pools are an aggregation of virtual devices (vdevs), which in turn can be constructed of different block devices, such as files, partitions or entire disks. Block devices within a vdev can be configured with different RAID levels, depending on redundancy needs. Pools can be composed of a mix of different types of block devices, e.g. partitions and disks, and their size can be flexibly extended, as easy as adding a new vdev to the pool.
  • Datasets are a tree of blocks within a pool, presented either as a filesystem, i.e. file interface, or as a volume, i.e. block interface. Datasets can be easily resized and volumes can be thinly provisioned. Both zones and KVMs make use of ZFS datasets: zones use ZFS filesystems while KVMs use ZFS volumes.

In the next part of the SmartOS Series we’ll explore DTrace, a performance analysis and troubleshooting tool.

SmartOS Series: Virtualisation

Last week we started a new blog post series on SmartOS. Today we continue in this series and explore in details the virtualisation aspects of SmartOS.

SmartOS offers two types of OS virtualisation: the Solaris-inherited container-based virtualisation, i.e. zones, and the hosted virtualisation ported to SmartOS by Joyent, KVM.

Containers are a combination of resource controls and Solaris zones, i.e. a complete isolated virtual environment, that provide an efficient virtualisation solution and a complete and secure user space environment on a single global kernel. SmartOS uses sparse zones, meaning that only a portion of the file system is replicated in the zone, while the rest of the file system and other resources, e.g. packages, are shared across all zones. This limits the duplication of resources, provides a very lightweight virtualisation layer and makes OS upgrading and patching very easy. Given that no hardware emulation is involved and that guest applications talk directly to the native kernel, container-based virtualisation gives a close-to-native level of performance.

osvirt

SmartOS container-based virtualisation (Source: wiki.smartos.org)

SmartOS provides two resource controls methods: fair share scheduler and CPU capping. With fair share scheduler a system administrator is able to define a minimum guaranteed share of CPU for a zone; this guarantee that, when the system is busy, all zones will get their fair share of CPU. CPU capping sets an upper limit on the amount of CPU that a zone will get. Joyent also introduced a CPU bursting feature that let system administrators define a base level of CPU usage and an upper limit and also specify how much time a zone is allowed to burst, making it possible for the zone to get more resources when required.

SmartOS already offer a wide set of features, but to make it a truly Cloud OS an important feature was missing: hosted virtualisation. Joyent bridged this gap by porting to SmartOS one of the best hosted virtualisation platform: KVM. KVM on SmartOS is only available on Intel processors with VT-x and EPT (Extended Page Tables) enabled and only supports x86 and x86-64 guests. Nonetheless, this still gives the capability to run unmodified Linux or Windows guests on top of SmartOS.

In hosted virtualisation hardware is emulated and exposed to virtual machine; in SmartOS, KVM doesn’t emulate hardware itself, but it exposes an interface that is then used by QEMU (Quick Emulator). When the guest emulated architecture is the same as the host architecture, QEMU can make use of KVM features such as acceleration to increase performance.

kvm

SmartOS KVM virtualisation (Source: wiki.smartos.org)

KVM virtual machines on SmartOS still run inside a zone, therefore combining the benefits of container-based virtualisation with the power of hosted virtualisation, with QEMU as the only process running in the zone.

In the next part of the SmartOS Series we will look into ZFS, SmartOS powerful storage component.

SmartOS Series: A SmartOS Primer

Some time back we introduced a piece of work that we are working on: OpenStack on SmartOS. Today we start a new blog post series to dig into SmartOS and its features. We’ll start with a quick introduction to SmartOS to get everyone started with this platform.

SmartOS is an open source live operating system mainly dedicated to offer a virtualisation platform. It’s based on illumos, which in turn it’s derived form OpenSolaris, thus inherits many Solaris-like features, such as zones, ZFS and DTrace. Joyent, the company behind SmartOS, further enhanced the illumos platform by adding a porting of KVM and features like I/O throttling. The core features of SmartOS will be the topic of the next posts in this Series. Thanks to these features, SmartOS makes the perfect candidate for a truly Cloud OS.

The following presentation will walk you through the basic tasks to setup, configure and administer SmartOS:

For the next topics we will cover SmartOS virtualisation (Zones and KVM), SmartOS storage (ZFS), SmartOS networking (Crossbow) and SmartOS observability (DTrace).

3rd Swiss OpenStack User Group Meetup


chosug
Following on from our 2nd meeting, the Swiss OpenStack user group met on 24th of April at the University of Bern.It was an excellent event with many attention grabbing presentations! A big thanks goes out to the sponsors:

 

 

Once we kicked off
, there were five presentations, 3 which were more detailed and 2 that were more lightning talks in nature. The presentations in there running order were:

Upcoming

There are other upcoming Swiss events that will include much talk of OpenStack. Of note are:

Also the Swiss Informatics Society have started a cloud computing special interest group, where all folk active in cloud are welcomed to join. More details can be found at their site.

Swiss OpenStack User Group channels